Grammar in Context

Dr. Drissia CHOUIT, Moulay Ismail University

Dr. Abdelhamid NFISSI, Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University

 

Grammar S1 (48h)

Objectives:

       The aim of this course is two-fold: (1) to explain grammatical rules that govern English and how they are used in context; (2) to enable students to bridge the gap between knowing grammatical structures and using them effectively.

        The course is built around a context-based grammar. After an overview of traditional lists of rules, students are introduced to grammar in context, using authentic texts taken from various sources, such as newspapers, literary texts, and publications on contemporary issues. The main advantages for students to explore grammar in context include (1) enabling them to bridge the gap between language study and language use; (2) offering them the opportunity to be exposed to grammar in its contexts of use, giving examples of real language use; and (3) helping them to become active, confident, and autonomous learners.

Content

       Parts of Speech; Tenses

Key Topics

       Parts of Speech; Tenses; Grammar in use; authentic examples; developing awareness of the English language forms and how they are used in real communication contexts

Syllabus Plan

I. Parts of speech

     - Nature of Parts of Speech

     - Functions of Parts of Speech

II. Tenses

II.1. Present Tenses

-          Present Simple

-          Present Simple Continuous

-          Present Perfect Simple

-          Present Perfect Continuous

GRAMMAR IN USE: Present Tenses in Context

Exercises

II.2. Past Tenses

-          Past Simple

-          Past Continuous

-          Past Perfect Simple

-          Past Perfect Continuous

GRAMMAR IN USE: Past Tenses in Context

Exercises

II.3. The Future

-          The Future Simple

-          The Future Continuous

-          The Future Perfect

-          Other Forms Used with Future Meaning

- Present Simple

       - Present Continuous

       - TO BE GOING TO

GRAMMAR IN USE: -  Present and Future in Context

                                  - Tenses in Context

Exercises

 

Further Reading

Adamczewski, H. The Secret Architecture of English Grammar.

         France: Editions EMA, 2002. 

Chouit, D. and Nfissi, A. (2018). Understanding Grammar in Context:

         A Step by Step Guide. Fez: Info-Print.

 

Grammar S2 (48h)

Objectives:

           This course deals with major chapters of English grammar. It is based on authentic and easy to understand texts, designed to give students examples of real language use. It aims (1) to explain grammatical forms and how they are used in context; (2) to enable students to bridge the gap between knowing grammatical structures and using them effectively. These skills are, in fact, life-long skills that would be beneficial to students in all subjects as well as later in their prospect careers.

Content:

       Conditionals; Passive Voice; Reported Speech; Modals

Key Topics:

       To show how grammar is context-sensitive; to bridge the gap between language study and language use; to give students examples of grammar as it is used in real communication contexts; to help students become active, confident, and autonomous learners.

Syllabus Plan:

I. Conditionals

     - Form: Types of Conditional Sentences

     - Uses: Grammar in Context

     - Inverted Constructions

     - Other Conjunctions with Conditional Meaning

EXPLORING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT: Text Analysis

Exercises

II. The Passive Voice

     -Form

          - Shift in Focus with the Passive

          - Steps to Follow to Change an Active Sentence into a Passive Sentence

          - Tenses in the passive

          - Passive with Modals

          - Passive with TO BE GOING TO

     - Uses: Grammar in Context

          - Contexts that necessitate the use of the Passive Voice (without by-phrase)

          - Passive Sentences with BY-Agents

- Types of sentences that have no passive alternative

EXPLORING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT: Text Analysis

Exercises

III. Reported Speech

- Introduction

     - Difference between Direct and Reported Speech

     - Parts of a Reported Sentence

- Types of Reported Clauses

- Main Transformations

     - Changes in Verb Tenses

     - Changes in Adverbs of Time and Place

     - Changes in Pronouns

- Reporting Ideas and Facts with Passives

Exercises

IV. Modals

- Introduction

     - Definition of Modals

     - Properties of Modals

- MAY/MIGHT

- CAN/COULD/BE ABLE TO

- SHALL/WILL

- WOULD

- SHOULD/OUGHT TO

- MUST/HAVE TO

- NEEDN'T/ DIDN'T NEED

EXPLORING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT: Text Analysis

-          Identifying Degrees of Certainty

-          Identifying Degrees of Necessity

Exercises

 

Bibliograhy

Adamczewski, H. (2002). The Secret Architecture of English Grammar.

         France: Editions EMA. 

Aitken, R.  (1992). Teaching Tenses. Hong Kong: Thomas Nelson Ltd.

Azar, B.S. (1999). Understanding and Using English Grammar.

          USA: Prentice Hall.

Baugh, L.S. (1991). Essentials of English Grammar. London: Guild Publishing.

Arnaudet, M.L. and Barrett, M.E. (1984). Approaches to Academic

         Reading and Writing. USA: Prentice Hall.

Brieger, N. and Sweeney, S. (1994).  The Language of Business

         English: Grammar and  Functions. Great Britain: Prentice Hall.

Carter, R., Hughes, R. and McCarthy, M. (2000). Exploring Grammar in

         Context. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Chouit, D. (2008). "A Linguistic Grammar of English". In ALMISBAHIA

        N.8, 2008: 140-165.

Chouit, D. and Nfissi, A. (2018). Understanding Grammar in Context:

        A Step by Step Guide. Fez: Info-Print.

Collins Cobuild Series. (1990). English Grammar: Helping learners with

         real English. UK: Harper Collins

Dunn, D. (1997). Why an Explicative Grammar? Collection

          Grammatica, France: La Tilv.

Feigenbaum, I. (1985). The Grammar Handbook. USA:

          Oxford University Press.

Hacker, D. (1998). A Writer's Reference. 3rd ed. USA: Bedford.

Koch, R.S. and Folse, K.S. (2006). Focus on Grammar: An Integrated

          Skills Approach.  3rd ed. USA: Pearson.

Leech, G., Deuchar, M. and Hoogenraad. (1982). English Grammar for

        Today: a New Introduction; Hong Kong: MacMillan Press.

Lewis, M. (1986). The English Verb: An Exploration of Structure and Meaning.

        UK: LTP.

Master, P.A. (1996). Science, Medicine and Technology: English

         Grammar and Technical Writing. USA: Prentice Hall.

Maurer, J. (2000). Focus on Grammar: An Advanced Course

          for Reference and Practice. 2nd ed. USA: Longman.

Miller, J.L. and Cohen, R.F. (1995). North Star: Focus on Reading and

          Writing Advanced. New York: Longman.

Murphy, R. (1994). English Grammar in Use. 2nd ed. Cambridge:

          Cambridge University Press.

Nettle, N and Hopkins, D. (2003). Developing Grammar in Context.

          Italy: Cambridge University Press.

Omaggio, H.A. (1993). Teaching Language in Context. 2nd ed.  

         USA: Heinle & Heinle Publishers.

Quirk, R. and Greenbaum, S. (1973). A University Grammar of English.

         Hong Kong: Longman. 

Smalley, R.L., Ruetten, M.K. and Kozerev, J.R. (2000).  Refining Composition Skills:

          Rhetoric and Grammar. 5th ed. USA: Heinle & Heinle.

Thornbury, S. (1999). How to Teach Grammar. Malaysia: Pearson

         Education Limited.

Werner, P.K. and Nelson, J.P. (1996). A Content-Based Grammar,

         3rd ed. USA: McGraw-Hill.               

Williams, J.D. (1999). The Teacher's Grammar Book.USA: Lawrence

          Erlbaum Associates.

 

 25/10/2018    

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24.09 | 17:04

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22.09 | 15:44

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